Monday, June 30, 2014

Baltimore Immigration Memorial

Are you familiar with the Baltimore Immigration Memorial (BIM)? If not, check out their website at http://www.immigrationbaltimore.org.

The project was founded in 1992 to "explore, document and preserve Baltimore's immigration-rich heritage, and to make it available to the public through a range of community and educational initiatives."

The project has several initiatives, which include:
  • walking tours,
  • traveling exhibitions,
  • audio and video tours,
  • research, and 
  • an immigration museum.
The immigration museum in the "Immigration House" is set to open at the end of this year.

Additionally, the BIM is seeking assistance with:
  • fundraising,
  • historical research,
  • themed walking tours, and 
  • administrative support.
They are also seeking document and artifact donations.

You can send comments and/or questions to 2014@immigrationbaltimore.org.

Debra A. Hoffman, "Baltimore Immigration Memorial," Ancestral Leaves, posted 30 June 2014 (http://ancestralleaves.blogspot.com : viewed [date]). [Please feel free to link to the specific post if you prefer.]




Sunday, June 22, 2014

The Salt Lake Institute of Genealogy's Course "Finding Immigrant Origins" Offered in January 2015

     The Salt Lake Institute of Genealogy is offering two great courses to help researchers find their immigrant ancestors. Last week, I highlighted the "Advanced German Research" course. This week I showcase "Finding Immigrant Origins."

     The following is the post I wrote for UGA's blog found at http://ugagenealogy.blogspot.com/2014/06/are-you-in-search-of-your-ancestorss.html:

"SLIG's is offering "Finding Immigrant Origins" in January 2015. This course covers the key historical sources and research methodologies for family historians tracing immigrant origins. Students begin by envisioning the immigrant within the context of his family, community, and culture. Historical documents created by the pushes and pulls that motivated his journey abroad are examined. Methodologies are reviewed for analyzing and correlating information found in U.S. record sources and immigration records to discover the immigrant’s old-world origins. Principles and practices are illustrated for tracing immigrants back to many specific countries and for effective online research of immigrant ancestors. Additional topics include chain migration, ethnic migration paths, surname localization, DNA evidence, cluster genealogy, and other tools to help find an immigrant’s ancestral village.

The expert instructors are:
· David Ouimette, CG
· Trish Tolley, AG
· John Colletta, PhD
· Suzanne Adams, AG
· Jeff Svare, AG
· Lynn Turner, AG

Below are the specific topics that will be covered during the week-long course:
o Identifying the Immigrant within the Family and Community
o The Ebb and Flow of Immigrants to America: Colonial Times to WW II
o Ethnic Migration Paths (and the Pushes and Pulls of Immigration)
o Family and Local Records: Histories, Biographies, and Newspapers
o Vital Records, Parish Registers, Probate, and Cemeteries
o U.S. Customs and Immigration Lists, 1820-1957
o Censuses, City Directories, and Name Lists
o Naturalization Records, Colonial Times to Early 20th Century
o Immigration to Colonial America
o UK and Irish Immigration
o Localizing the Surname: Dictionaries and Heat Maps
o Online Immigration Research: Computer Lab
o Eastern European Immigration
o Scandinavian Immigration
o German Immigration
o Italian Immigration
o Hispanic Immigration
o Chain Migration: Polish Case Study
o Interpreting the Place Name: Linguistics, Maps and Gazetteers
o DNA Evidence of Ancestral Origins

Spots still remain in this course, so register today to save yourself a seat for this informative track. It promises to provide the knowledge to help you determine your ancestor's immigrant origins! You can register at http://www.infouga.org/aem.php?lv=p&epg=68."

     I hope that you will take a look at SLIG's courses for next year. Early-bird registration ends October 31st. Don't wait to register as some of the courses only have a few seats left!


Debra A. Hoffman, "The Salt Lake Institute of Genealogy's Course 'Finding Immigrant Origins,'" Ancestral Leaves, posted 22 June 2014 (http://ancestralleaves.blogspot.com : viewed [date]). [Please feel free to link to the specific post if you prefer.]

Sunday, June 15, 2014

Advanced German Research Course at the Salt Lake Institute of Genealogy in 2015

     The Salt Lake Institute of Genealogy opened registration for their 2015 institute this past Saturday. Currently, there are only 3 slots available in this course. I took the course two years ago and found it to be a fantastic educational opportunity to gain advanced skills in conducting German research.

     Below is additional information from UGA's blog:

     "Do you have German ancestors? Would you like to find out how to effectively research your German heritage? This advanced methods course is designed for genealogists with basic church book experience who are ready to develop advanced skills. In addition, students have the opportunity to put their new found knowledge and skills to work researching in the German resources at the Family History Library

     F. Warren Bittner, CG is the coordinator for this in-depth German course. He is joined by well-known instructors Baerbel Johnson, Michael Lacopo, Fritz Juengling, and Daniel Jones. They will provide their expertise covering the following topics over the course of the week:
  • Historical Overview of Germany 
  • German Territories, Maps and Jurisdictions 
  • Meyers Gazetteer: Bible of German Research 
  • Research in the 19 Century German States 
  • Difficult Immigrant Examples 
  • German Research in Eastern Areas 
  • Methods for Identifying the German Origins of American Immigrants
  • Proving Immigrant Identities: The Case of Dora Lühr 
  • Social Levels and Occupations 
  • German Marriage Laws and Customs 
  • Reading for Historical Context 
  • German Social History and Genealogical Research 
  • Online Church Resources and Village Family Books 
  • What’s New in German Internet Research 
  • Guilds and Their Records 
  • German Research and the Law 
  • Complex Evidence: The Case of Balthasar Weber 
  • Complex Evidence: The Gard family of Hesse 
  • Beyond the Church Books 
  • Onsite Research in German Archives 
     Find additional information on SLIG at http://www.infouga.org/cpage.php?pt=42."

     If you want to go beyond using German church records, consider registering for this course. An added bonus is being able to conduct research on your German ancestors at the Family History Library!

Debra A. Hoffman, "Advanced German Research Course at the Salt Lake Institute of Genealogy in 2015," Ancestral Leaves, posted 15 June 2014 (http://ancestralleaves.blogspot.com : viewed [date]). [Please feel free to link to the specific post if you prefer.]

Sunday, June 1, 2014

Resources for Finding Church Records in the City of Baltimore - Part 2

     In addition to those two books, the Maryland Genealogical Society added another invaluable guide when they published “A Geographical Guide to Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Baltimore Houses of Worship” by Francis P. O’Neill in four installments in the Maryland Genealogical Society Journal from 2008-2010. This resource provides a means for researchers to determine what churches existed in a specific geographical area of the city. To illustrate, if your ancestor was a Lutheran and lived in the southeast part of the city, by reviewing the guide for that quadrant, you could locate the relevant churches in that area. Combining that information with Kanely’s church record book allows you to determine the existence and location of potentially applicable records.

     O’Neill’s guide became interactive in 2013 when Stephen A. Conner developed a website (http://connergenealogy.com/BaltimoreChurchLocator.html)
based on the articles. Before using the website, it is advisable to read Mr. Conner’s guide “Baltimore City, Maryland – Historical Houses of Worship Locator.” The link is found at the top of the website.

     Another helpful feature of the guide is the section on frequently asked questions.

     These resources have made locating your ancestor’s church in the City of Baltimore an interactive and easier experience. Good luck with your search!

Bibliography

Conner, Stephen A. “Baltimore City Houses of Worship Locator.” Connergenealogy.com.
     http://connergenealogy.com/BaltimoreChurchLocator.html : accessed 2013.

Kanely, Edna A. Directory of Maryland Church Records. Silver Spring, Md.: Family Line
     Publications, 1987.

Kanely, Edna A. Directory of Ministers and Maryland Churches They Served, 1634-1990.
     Westminster, Md.: Family Line Publications, 1991.

O’Neill, Francis P. “A Geographical Guide to Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century Baltimore
     Houses of Worship, Quadrant I: Southeast.” Maryland Genealogical Society Journal 49,
     no. 3 (2008): 7-15.

O’Neill, Francis P. “A Geographical Guide to Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century Baltimore
     Houses of Worship, Quadrant II: Northeast.” Maryland Genealogical Society Journal 50,
     no. 1 (2009): 25-40.

O’Neill, Francis P. “A Geographical Guide to Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century Baltimore
     Houses of Worship, Quadrant III: Northwest.” Maryland Genealogical Society Journal 50,
     no. 2 (2009): 237-251.

O’Neill, Francis P. “A Geographical Guide to Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century Baltimore
     Houses of Worship, Quadrant I: Southeast.” Maryland Genealogical Society Journal 51
     (2010), no. 1: 33-40.


Debra A. Hoffman, "Resources for Finding Church Records in the City of Baltimore - Part 2," Ancestral Leaves, posted 1 June 2014 (http://ancestralleaves.blogspot.com : viewed [date]). [Please feel free to link to the specific post if you prefer.]

Saturday, May 24, 2014

Resources for Finding Church Records in the City of Baltimore

For Baltimore births and deaths prior to 1875, research in church records is necessary. There are several wonderful resources that can guide your search for relevant church records.

Two books by author Edna A. Kanely have been assisting researchers for years in locating Maryland church records. A Directory of Maryland Church Records, sponsored by the Genealogical Council of Maryland and published in 1987, provides a “comprehensive summary of the location and availability of Maryland church records.”[1] This book covers about 2,600 Maryland churches.

Ms. Kanely’s other book, entitled Directory of Ministers and Maryland Churches They Served, 1634-1990, can help you determine the associated church of a particular minister. As an example, a newspaper marriage announcement or a civil marriage record may provide the name of the minister that married your ancestral couple.[2] By consulting Kanely’s Directory, you can determine what church or churches the minister may have served and the associated time period(s). With that information, you can determine the availability of the records in A Directory of Maryland Church Records.




[1] Edna A. Kanely, Directory of Maryland Church Records (Silver Spring, Md.: Family Line Publications, 1987), v.
[2] The City of Baltimore has civil marriage records starting in 1851 when Baltimore became an independent city. Prior to 1851, the marriage records would be found in Baltimore County.

Debra A. Hoffman, "Resources for Finding Church Records in the City of Baltimore," Ancestral Leaves, posted 24 May 2014 (http://ancestralleaves.blogspot.com : viewed [date]). [Please feel free to link to the specific post if you prefer.]


Saturday, May 17, 2014

New German Genealogy Guide


Author James Beidler has published a new German genealogy guide. From The Family Tree site, http://www.shopfamilytree.com/the-family-tree-german-genealogy-guide-group :

"In this book, you’ll learn how to:
Retrace your German immigrant ancestors’ voyage from Europe to America
Pinpoint the precise place in Europe your ancestors came from
Uncover birth, marriage, death, church, census, court, military, and other records documenting your ancestors’ lives
Access German records of your family from your own hometown
Decipher German-language records, including unfamiliar German script
Understand German names and naming patterns that offer research clues

You’ll also find maps, timelines, sample records and resource lists throughout the book for quick and easy reference. Whether you’re just beginning your family tree or a longtime genealogy researcher, the Family Tree German Genealogy Guide will help you conquer the unique challenges of German research and uncover your ancestors’ stories."

If you are starting to research your German ancestors, this beginning guide will help get you off on the right track!


Debra A. Hoffman, "New German Genealogy Guide," Ancestral Leaves, posted 17 May 2014 (http://ancestralleaves.blogspot.com : viewed [date]). [Please feel free to link to the specific post if you prefer.]

Wednesday, May 14, 2014

Mortality for 3 June 1897 in Baltimore, Maryland

My last post illustrated how some newspapers would also post a listing of deaths that had occurred over several days. This one provides that information again for a different day.

The first step is to decipher the Fraktur print and then translate it from German to English as shown below. I enlarged the image, so that I could determine each letter and then used Google Translate to translate it from German to English.

“Todesfälle,” Der Deutsche Correspondent (Baltimore, Maryland), 3 June 1897, p. 2, col. 3; microfilm NP 2267, Central Library, Enoch Pratt Free Library, Baltimore, Maryland.

Todesfälle
Am 1. Juni August Beder, 71 Jahre alt.
Am 1. Juni Bernard Schaffeld, 42 Jahre
alt.
Am 31. Mai Herbert Abrams.
Am 31. Mai Gertie Hunger.
Am 30. Mai Christian Fischer in Orange-
ville, Baltimore-County, 19 Jahre alt.
Am 30. Mai Samuel Lürz.

Mortality
On June 1, August Beder, 71 years old.
On June 1, Bernard Schaffeld, 42 years
old.
On May 31, Herbert Abrams.
On May 31, Gertie Hunger.
On May 30, Christian Fischer in Orange-
ville, Baltimore-County, 19 years old.
On May 30, Samuel Lürz.


Debra A. Hoffman, "Mortality for 3 June 1897," Ancestral Leaves, posted 14 May 2014 (http://ancestralleaves.blogspot.com : viewed [date]). [Please feel free to link to the specific post if you prefer.]